Nocturnal Animals are a Pain

People dream of koalas, kangaroos, Tasmanian devils and other uniquely Australian animals and are bummed when they find they are nocturnal and nearly impossible to get a look at. It is just to hot for animals to be out in the day time during the Australian summer – way to hot.

For that reason there are animal parks scattered around the countryside offering a chance to get a look at many of there creatures that you have read about. We visit one of these facilities so people can get a look at these creatures. It isn’t a perfect solution but it is much better than nothing. So here are a few things that you might occasionally see outdoors but will likely see at a wildlife park like Featherdale near Sydney.

DSC_8839.jpg
These three frogmouths look like grumpy Ewoks. The frogmouth is a bird related to whip-poor-will and similar species. There are a few species around the world; in tropical climates mostly. These are adults though have a somewhat adolescent look to  them.
DSC_8893.jpg
Australia has many reptiles; lizards and snakes predominate. These goannas are like monitors through much of the world. They are/were an important food source for the aboriginal peoples.
DSC_8842.jpg
Here is a koala in action – inaction perhaps. They sleep or rest most of the day. Their food source (a few types of eucalyptus) is pretty lean and eating and resting pretty much makes up a koalas day.
DSC_8880.jpg
Monotremes lay eggs and this echidna is one of the two monotremes in the world (though there are more than one species of echidna. The echidna looks like a hedgehog/porcupine sort of animal and is about the size of an inflated (go Pats) football. Where the platypus, the other monotreme, has thousands of electroreceptors on its bill the echidna has just a few hundred. But, in both animals it is assumed that they can use the electroreceptors to find prey or determine the distance to prey. Though echidnas can and do eat ants and termites they are not closely related to anteaters (a South American group).

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: